New Website Launched to Help Women Fight Joint Pain

A new Web site ( ) dedicated to helping women fight joint pain was launched in USA on Friday. The site is designed to help joint-pain sufferers take control of their lives with a unique 70/30 joint-health plan. The site also examines new research that reveals the truth about the makeup of joint cartilage, provides expert opinions on why glucosamine has not met expectations in supporting joint health, and offers a place for women to connect and share ideas on living pain-free.

“Our goal is to help the many people suffering from joint pain live active, healthy, pain-free lives,” said Leonard P. Smith, CEO, BSP Pharma, creator of the site. “Following the recent announcement from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health regarding the ineffectiveness of glucosamine and chondroitin in treating chronic joint conditions, many joint-pain sufferers are confused and concerned about their options. This site can help clear the confusion.”

Because women have less joint cartilage than men, when it breaks down, it affects them in more places with more intensity. In fact, after menopause women experience a significant decline in joint collagen, which makes up 70 percent of cartilage and provides structure, strength and smoothness to the joint. examines exciting new research that actually explains why glucosamine and chondroitin could not meet expectations as a comprehensive joint treatment because they are only 30 percent of the solution, and don’t address the deterioration of Type II collagen, which makes up 70 percent of joint cartilage.

The breakthrough research by Dr. Phillip Cheras, pioneering researcher, published author, and former deputy director of the Australian Center for Complementary Medicine Education and Research, found that adults who regularly took a patent-pending shea treiterpene concentrate had remarkable results. Cheras observed that study participants experienced dramatic reduction in joint pain and joint-specific inflammation, while stabilizing the breakdown of Type II collagen. When joint collagen is stabilized, it may complement the effects of glucosamine for 100 percent joint support.

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